Jayd’s Legacy

L. Divine

It’s official: South Bay High’s finest, Jayd Jackson, and its coolest white boy, Jeremy Weiner, are a couple. And if that’s not enough interracial drama for South Bay’s mostly white, wealthy student body, Jayd and her bold, beautiful crew have more on the way . . .

Friends and teachers at South Bay High may be hating, while Jayd and Jeremy are falling in love, and if anyone has a problem with their happiness, especially an ex who’s back in Jayd’s life aiming to sweep her off her feet—well, that’s no surprise. This is Drama High after all. And Jayd is no stranger to controversy—it’s in her blood, and it seems it’s in her girl Nellie’s blood too.

Homecoming is just around the corner, and South Bay High has never had a black princess, queen, or royalty of any kind for any event. But that’s about to change. The Drama Club is sponsoring Nellie to run for the junior class, hoping to give the Cheerleaders and Athletes a run for their money. If Nellie wins, she’ll make history. In fact, Nellie is so deep in the zone, Jayd’s afraid she’ll forget to watch her back because the students of South Bay are serious about their crowns. As Nellie’s chances for victory heat up, so does the hostility from the smartass opposition. Nellie may be flying too high to notice, but Jayd can see the drama coming. And as usual, she’s on it—with a little help from her magical Mama and her mystical ancestors, of course.

Paper 9.95
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From Fugitive Slave to Free Man: The Autobiography of William Wells Brown

William Wells Brown

Growing up as a slave in an urban area of Missouri allowed William Wells Brown to live a life that was different from that of the plantation slave so often discussed in slave histories. Born in 1814, the son of a white man and a slave woman, Brown spent the first twenty years of his life mainly in St. Louis and the surrounding areas workings as a house servant, a field hand, a tavern keeper’s assistant, a printer’s helper, an assistant in a medical office, and a handyman for James Walker, a Missouri slave trader. During his time with Walker, Brown made three trips up and the down the Mississippi River. These trips allowed him to encounter slavery from every perspective and provided experiences he would draw on throughout his writing career.

In From Fugitive Slave to Free Man, two of Brown’s best-known writings, Narrative of William W. Brown, A Fugitive Slave. Written by Himself and My Southern Home: or, The South and Its People, are reprinted together. Brown’s Narrative, published in 1847, was his first autobiographical writing and was received with wide acclaim, going through four American and five British editions. Only Frederick Douglass’s autobiography sold better, casting a constant shadow over Brown’s works. Douglass and his life were touted as extraordinary, while Brown was referred to as the typical “every man’s slave.” However, the life of William Brown and his writings prove otherwise. Determined to be a man of letters, Brown was known as the first African American to write a travel book, Three Years in Europe: or, Places I Have Seen and People I Have Met, which was based on his time abroad in Paris at an international peace conference and in England on an anti-slavery crusade. A year later he published Clotel, the first novel written by an African American and the first to exploit the decades-old rumors of an affair between President Thomas Jefferson and his slave Sally Hemmings. Between 1854 and 1867, Brown published the first drama by an African American, The Escape: or, A Leap for Freedom, and two volumes of Black history, one of which is the first military history of the African American in the United States. In 1880, Brown wrote his final autobiography, My Southern Home. In it he endeavors to explain the complex interrelationships between Blacks and whites in the South. Taken together, both of the books included in this volume provide fascinating contrasts, especially in their depictions of slavery, and illustrate the creative innovations Brown developed in the form of life writing–some of which were more radical than Douglass’s and more prophetic of the future of African American literature.

Paper 34.95
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Deal with It

McKayhan Monica

Indigo and her best friend Jade are at the top of their game as the most popular girls in school and the best dancers on the squad. But when Jade is chosen as squad captain, Indigo becomes jealous. And they’re not the only ones on the squad dealing with major drama.

Paper 9.99
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A la Carte

Tanita Davis
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Seventeen-year-old Lainey dreams of becoming a world-famous chef. But when her best friend–and secret crush–suddenly leaves town, Lainey finds solace in her cooking as she comes to terms with the past and begins a new recipe for the future. This delicious debut novel is peppered with recipes from Lainey’s notebooks.
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Cloth 15.99
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Paper 8.99
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Mis-Education of the Negro

Carter G. Woodson

“When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his “proper place” and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His question of education makes it necessary.”

“The race will free itself from exploiters just as soon as it decides to do so. No one else can accomplish this task for the race. It must plan and do for itself.”  — Carter G. Woodson

The Miseducation of the Negro describes the plight of our schools like no other book. He makes it plain. Woodson says that either you are taught to value yourself primarily, or are taught to value someone else primarily. You are taught to be concerned with satisfying the needs of your community or trained to satisfy another’s. Education gives you backbone or teaches you to lean. Carter G. Woodson is the Father of Black History and “Black history is your history.” — James Baldwin

Paper 9.99
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Coldest Winter Ever

Sister Souljah

“I came busting into the world during one of New York’s worst snowstorms, so my mother named me Winter.”

Ghetto-born, Winter is the young, wealthy daughter of a prominent Brooklyn drug-dealing family. Quick-witted, sexy, and business-minded, she knows and loves the streets like the curves of her own body. But when a cold Winter wind blows her life in a direction she doesn’t want to go, her street smarts and seductive skills are put to the test of a lifetime. Unwilling to lose, this ghetto girl will do “anything” to stay on top.

Cloth 21.95
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Paper 16.00
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