Black Unity: The Total Solution to Financial Independence and Happiness

Terrance Amen


Terrance Amen

“Working together can make you prosperous. We hold the keys to our success, but those keys have only been used to benefit other groups. We spend almost a trillion dollars a year, but 99 percent of that money goes to help others become successful. The question to ask ourselves is: Why don’t we help our own community?  A united Black community can receive wealth and good health.

Here’s what you’ll find in Black Unity: The Total Solution to Financial Independence and Happiness:

1. a simple way to bring one hundred billion dollars or more of the money you’re already spending back to your community.

2. create a million new jobs by doing something we’ve done in the past.

3. a 100% guaranteed plan to create our own affirmative action programs

4. how to save money while investing in education, mortgages, tax and legal advise, insurance, and other products and services.

5. a national plan of action that covers education, health, family, business, finance, a better way to guarantee reparations, and other issues.

6. the main reason why we aren’t supporting our community now.” –Terrence Amen

Paper
17.95
some_text

A la Carte

Tanita Davis
<br>
Seventeen-year-old Lainey dreams of becoming a world-famous chef. But when her best friend–and secret crush–suddenly leaves town, Lainey finds solace in her cooking as she comes to terms with the past and begins a new recipe for the future. This delicious debut novel is peppered with recipes from Lainey’s notebooks.
<br>
Cloth 15.99
some_text
Paper 8.99
some_text

Mis-Education of the Negro

Carter G. Woodson

“When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his “proper place” and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His question of education makes it necessary.”

“The race will free itself from exploiters just as soon as it decides to do so. No one else can accomplish this task for the race. It must plan and do for itself.”  — Carter G. Woodson

The Miseducation of the Negro describes the plight of our schools like no other book. He makes it plain. Woodson says that either you are taught to value yourself primarily, or are taught to value someone else primarily. You are taught to be concerned with satisfying the needs of your community or trained to satisfy another’s. Education gives you backbone or teaches you to lean. Carter G. Woodson is the Father of Black History and “Black history is your history.” — James Baldwin

Paper 9.99
some_text

Coldest Winter Ever

Sister Souljah

“I came busting into the world during one of New York’s worst snowstorms, so my mother named me Winter.”

Ghetto-born, Winter is the young, wealthy daughter of a prominent Brooklyn drug-dealing family. Quick-witted, sexy, and business-minded, she knows and loves the streets like the curves of her own body. But when a cold Winter wind blows her life in a direction she doesn’t want to go, her street smarts and seductive skills are put to the test of a lifetime. Unwilling to lose, this ghetto girl will do “anything” to stay on top.

Cloth 21.95
some_text
Paper 16.00
some_text

Planet of Junior Brown

Virginia Hamilton

Junior Brown, an overprotected three-hundred pound musical prodigy who’s prone to having fantasies, and Buddy Clark, a loner who lives by his wits because he has no family whatsoever, have been on the hook from their eighth-grade classroom all semester.
Most of the time they have been in the school building — in a secret cellar room behind a false wall, where Mr. Pool, the janitor, has made a model of the solar system. They have been pressing their luck for months. . . and then they are caught. As society — in the form of a zealous assistant principal — closes in on them, Junior’s fantasies become more desperate, and Buddy draws on all his resources to ensure his friend’s well-being.

Paper 6.99
some_text

Outside Shot

Walter Dean Myers

When Lonnie Jackson leaves Harlem for a basketball scholarship to a midwestern college, he know he must keep his head straight and his record clean. That’s the only way he’ll have a chance of making it to the pros someday.
But his street smarts haven’t prepared him for the pressures of tough classes, high-stakes college ball, and the temptation to fix games for local gamblers. Everyone plays by a whole new set of rules — including Sherry, who’s determined to be a track star. Her independence attracts Lonnie, but their on-again, off-again relationship is driving him crazy.
Lonnie has one year to learn how to make it as a “college man.” It’s his outside shot at a bright future. Does he have what it takes?

Paper 6.99
some_text