Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas

Emory Douglas

The Black Panther Party for Self Defense, formed in the aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965, remains one of the most controversial movements of the 20th-century. Founded by the charismatic Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, the party sounded a defiant cry for an end to the institutionalized subjugation of African Americans. The Black Panther newspaper was founded to articulate the party’s message and artist Emory Douglas became the paper’s art director and later the party’s Minister of Culture. Douglas’ artistic talents and experience proved a powerful combination: his striking collages of photographs and his own drawings combined to create some of the era’s most iconic images, like that of Newton with his signature beret and large gun set against a background of a blood-red star, which could be found blanketing neighborhoods during the 12 years the paper existed.This landmark book brings together a remarkable lineup of party insiders who detail the crafting of the Black Panther Party’s visual identity.

Paper
35.00
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Honey, I Love and Other Love Poems

Eloise Greenfield

Each of these sixteen “love poems” is spoken straight from the heart of a child. Riding on a train, listening to music, playing with a friend, with hand on hip, each poem loves everyday life. And each poem is accompanied by a beautiful drawing, both portrait and panorama, that deepens the insights contained in the singing words.
Eloise Greenfield and Diane and Leo Dillon have combined their rich talents to bring children a book that shows them the joys that come from seeing with a poet’s eyes–the eyes of love.

Paper 6.99
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Show Way

Jacqueline Woodson
Reaching into her own family history, Woodson presents the stirring story of generations of African-American women who inspired each other with their strength, family traditions, and determination.

“This is the first time I’ve written a book based on some of my own family history. ’Show Ways”, or quilts, once served as secret maps for freedom-seeking slaves. This is the story of seven generations of girls and women who were quilters and artists and freedom fighters. It begins in Virginia and ends right here in Brooklyn.The story began in my grandmother’s living room in the Bushwick section of Broolyn. I wrote it here in Park Slope, Brooklyn mostly. After my grandmother died and my daughter was born, I wanted to figure out a way to hold on to all the amazing history in our family.
I wanted a Show Way for my own daughter.” Jacqueline Woodson
Cloth 17.99
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City Kid

Nelson George

A candid, colorful memoir about a nerd from the Brooklyn projects who made it big Nelson George grew up in the Tilden housing project in the crime-and despair-ridden Brownsville section of Brooklyn during the 1960s and 70s. In this tough neighborhood, Nelson was the nerdy kid who, in between stickball and street games, devoured Captain America comics, Ernest Hemingway novels, and album liner notes.
   City Kid introduces us to Nelson’s family: his absent wanna-be-hustler father; his tough-minded sister, who is seduced by the streets; and his mother, who dreams of becoming a teacher and returning to the South. Amid the struggles of his family, Nelson finds himself drawn into the world of Black pop culture, first as a writer and then as a filmmaker, eventually collaborating with some of the major figures of the era: Spike Lee, Russell Simmons, Chris Rock, and many others.
Nelson’s story is ultimately one of triumph, of inspiration. Seeking transcendence through art and loving New York City, Nelson creates an insightful portrait of the emergence of Black artists in the 1980s and 90s and illuminates how the pain of life can be turned into thoughtful books and cinema.

Paper 14.00
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Where the River Meets the Ocean

devorah major

“I also see all art as political, whether by commission or omission. . . The choice of what to focus on is a political act, the choice of what to reveal or conceal is a political act, the choice of what to assert or deny is a political act. The choice of writing for a broad audience, or writing a text that can only be understood with a specialized vocabulary and particular aesthetic training is a political act. The choice of being a formalist and only writing in accepted Euro- specific poetic forms, or writing experimental verse, or writing with a myriad of approaches and styles are all not just artistic choices, but because of their cultural impact, also political acts.

But that does not mean that creating art is, or should be, an act of creating propaganda. It is not about doctrine, or political parties, but about the body politic. By the same token, bringing poetry as performance, as written art, or as writing workshops to people in schools and jails, libraries and half-way houses, homeless shelters and community centers is also a political act. Encouraging people to not only listen and hear, but also to use their own voices to critically examine their selves, their lives, and the world around them, is a political act.”

“what makes a poem revolutionary

does it violently refuse the page

construct a chaos of grammar

that denies metaphor or defeats meter

is it armed and ready for prolonged struggle

is it loud and insistent assaulting your senses

full of gun powder and iron pellets

is it unavailable for canonization

despite an early death as martyr

or does it instead

find guerrilla survival

hidden

underground

exploding in unexpected places

appearing once again     just

when you thought it dead”

published in Where the River Meets Ocean

© 2003

Paper 9.95
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Standing in the Shadows of Motown: The Life and Music of Legendary Bassist, James Jamerson (with 2 CD’s)

Alan “Dr. Licks” Slutsky

James Jamerson was a phenomenon. His bass lines were the “hooks” that were at least half the reason billions of songs sold. There are partial discographies that list 150 hits of Motown singles (30 of which were #1 hits), and partial discographies that include 180 albums or CD’s. About 70% of Jamerson’s performances went to the top of the R&B charts. Some of the singers he backed were: Diana Ross and the Supremes, The Temptations, Four Tops, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Martha and the Vandellas, Gladys Knight and the Pips, The Isley Brothers, Stevie Wonder, Tammy Terrel, Kim Weston, Mary Wells, The Jackson Five, Jr. Walker and the All Stars, The Contours, The Marvelletts, The Velvelettes, Brenda Holloway, Marv Johnson, David Ruffin, The Originals, Shorty Long, Marvin Gaye, Edwin Starr, Boz Scags, Bob Dylan, Tom Jones, The Osmunds, Dionne Warwick, Shirley Bassey, Maria Muldar, The Fifth Dimension, The Sylvers, Tina Marie, Rick James, The Dramatics, Al Green, Aretha Franklin, Otis Redding, Ray Charles, Marlena Shaw, Charo, The Mighty Clouds of Joy, Curtis Mayfield, Jackie Wilson, Johnny Mathis, The Hues Corporation, Billy Preston, Jerry Butler, Sammy Davis, Jr., Fontella Bass, John Lee Hooker, Johnny Taylor, John Handy, Hugo Montenegro, Yusef Lateef, Charles Wright and the Watts 103 Street Band, Quincy Jones, Billy Ekstine and Bobby Darin.   James Jamerson laid the track for the soul train

Standing in the Shadows of Motown: The Life of Legendary Bassist James Jamerson has an introduction by Paul McCartney. The book contains photos, interviews of The Funk Brothers, Motown singers, arrangers and composers, and transcriptions of some of his bass lines that are played by several great bass players (including Chuck Rainey and Marcus Miller) on the 2 CD’s that come with the book. The Grammy Award winning documentary, Standing in the Shadows of Motown, (based on this book) has narration written by Ntosake Shange and includes performances by Chaka Kahn, Gerald Levert, Meshell Ndegeocello, Michael Harper, Joan Osborne, Bootsie Collins, Montell Jordan and The Funk Brothers.

Paperback with 2CD’s $35.00
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Documentary with 2DVD’s $15.00
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The Freedom Guide for Music Creators, Second Edition

The Freedom Guide for Music CreatorsDeeann Mathews

Put your thinking cap on and fit it very well — The Freedom Guide for Music Creators is going to take you through the fundamentals of the music business, along with strategies and resources you will not hear about in many books and in much of your musical education.

You might also want to prepare to part with some long-held notions about money, work, economics, and United States history, because this is going to be a no-holds barred look at the world in which you are creating and re-creating music, and at the forces that define this world. Learn why YOU are about to get a taste of some of the hardest parts of the African American experience since the end of slavery — and what you can do to protect yourself as a musician!  The Freedom Guide for Music Creators will also show you:

How to get each and every one of your works the copyright registration they need at the lowest possible cost — AND the address and contact info of EVERY copyright office IN THE WORLD

How to handle SAMPLING — the right way, not the wrong way

How to get the proper licenses to cover ANY song — quickly and cost-effectively

What things you need to have in EVERY record contract — and the very things that will STEAL YOU BLIND if you don’t look out for them

The NUMBER ONE, time-honored, sure-fire way to build a fan base that lasts, no matter what fads and technology come and and go, and much, much more!

Deeann D. Mathews is an African American author, composer, arranger, and pianist living in San Francisco, California.  She is also the creative director of Praising Pilgrims Music, a growing publishing company of music and music-related materials based in San Francisco, California.

Paper 27.00
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Orders for Universities and Colleges

Welcome to all HBCU representatives, and thank you for your support of Marcus Bookstores.

With your purchase of The Freedom Guide for Music Creators, you will empower your students to master the fundamentals of the music business, and give them access to strategies and resources they will not hear about except through your actions today.  When your students receive The Freedom Guide for Music Creators, they will learn:

How the music business will try to put them through a taste of some of the hardest parts of the African American experience since the end of slavery — and what they can do to protect themselves

How to get each and every one of their compositions works the copyright registration they need at the lowest possible cost — AND the address and contact info of EVERY copyright office IN THE WORLD

How to handle SAMPLING — the right way, not the wrong way

How to get the proper licenses to cover ANY song — quickly and cost-effectively

What things they need to have in EVERY record contract — and the very things that will STEAL A MUSICIAN BLIND if not caught

The NUMBER ONE, time-honored, sure-fire way to build a fan base that lasts, no matter what fads and technology come and and go

And much more — all in a easy-to-read, concise format that lends itself to immediate action!

Thank you so much for your patronage of Marcus Bookstores — we appreciate working with you to educate Black musicians everywhere about how to handle their music business!  Order now, and change the lives of the talented young musicians you serve for the better — forever!

College and University Orders:

For 50 books at a 20 percent discount
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For 100 books at a 30 percent discount
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For 200 books at a 40 percent discount
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