The Friendship

Mildred D. Taylor

Cassie Logan and her brothers have been warned never to go to the Wallace store, so they know to expect trouble there. What they don’t expect is to hear Mr. Tom Bee, an elderly Black man, daring to call the white storekeeper by his first name. The year is 1933, the place is Mississippi, and any child knows that some things just aren’t done . . .

Paper 6.99
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Cloth 16.99
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Show Way

Jacqueline Woodson
Reaching into her own family history, Woodson presents the stirring story of generations of African-American women who inspired each other with their strength, family traditions, and determination.

“This is the first time I’ve written a book based on some of my own family history. ’Show Ways”, or quilts, once served as secret maps for freedom-seeking slaves. This is the story of seven generations of girls and women who were quilters and artists and freedom fighters. It begins in Virginia and ends right here in Brooklyn.The story began in my grandmother’s living room in the Bushwick section of Broolyn. I wrote it here in Park Slope, Brooklyn mostly. After my grandmother died and my daughter was born, I wanted to figure out a way to hold on to all the amazing history in our family.
I wanted a Show Way for my own daughter.” Jacqueline Woodson
Cloth 17.99
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Mis-Education of the Negro

Carter G. Woodson

“When you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his “proper place” and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His question of education makes it necessary.”

“The race will free itself from exploiters just as soon as it decides to do so. No one else can accomplish this task for the race. It must plan and do for itself.”  — Carter G. Woodson

The Miseducation of the Negro describes the plight of our schools like no other book. He makes it plain. Woodson says that either you are taught to value yourself primarily, or are taught to value someone else primarily. You are taught to be concerned with satisfying the needs of your community or trained to satisfy another’s. Education gives you backbone or teaches you to lean. Carter G. Woodson is the Father of Black History and “Black history is your history.” — James Baldwin

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Road to Memphis

Mildred Taylor

Set in Mississippi in 1941, The Road to Memphis describes three harrowing, unforgettable days in the life of an African-American high school girl dreaming of law school. Caught up in the center of tense racial dramas unfolding around her, Cassie Logan is forced to confront the adult world as never before. A Black youth, sadistically teased by two White boys in rural Mississippi, severely injures one of them with a tire iron and enlists Cassie’s help in trying to flee the state.

A Coretta Scott King Author Award Book.
“An engrossing, capably written picture of fine young people endeavoring to find the right way in a world that persistently wrongs them.”

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Little Rock Nine

Marshall Poe

Sixteen-year-old William McNally and fifteen-year-old Thomas Johnson both live in Little Rock, Arkansas, in the summer of 1957. They both love baseball and teasing their little sisters. There’s just one big difference — William is White, and Thomas, the son of William’s family’s maid, is Black. After the Supreme Court rules in favor of desegregating public schools, Little Rock Central High School prepares to enroll its first nine African-American students, and William and Thomas are caught in the center of a storm.

Paper 7.99
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Legend of Bass Reeves: Being the True and Fictional Account of the Most Valiant Marshall in the West

Gary Paulsen

Born into slavery, Bass Reeves became the most successful US Marshal of the Wild West.
Many “heroic lawmen” of the Wild West, familiar to us through television and film, were actually violent scoundrels and outlaws themselves. But of all the sheriffs of the frontier, one man stands out as a true hero: Bass Reeves.
He was the most successful Federal Marshal in the US in his day. True to the mythical code of the West, he never drew his gun first. He brought hundreds of fugitives to justice, was shot at countless times, and never hit.
Bass Reeves was a Black man, born into slavery. And though the laws of his country enslaved him and his mother, when he became a free man he served the law, with such courage and honor that he became a legend.

Paper 6.99
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